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Tuesday, August 03, 2021
You are here : About SSA  >  SSA News

27

Current COVID-19 Orders

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Some state and local governments have orders in effect that may limit operations. The list below is intended to capture recent orders from November 16, 2020 to present. For a list of other measures and orders that may still be in effect, click here. If you see a new order in your area of operation that is not covered in the list below, please email Joe Doherty or Daniel Bryant.

 

Alabama:

  • Alabama extended the Safer at Home order.
  • Alabama extended its Safer at Home order until January 22, 2021. Each person must wear a mask or other facial covering that covers his or her nostrils and mouth at all times when within six feet of a person from another household in any of the following places: an indoor space open to the general public, a vehicle operated by a transportation service, or an outdoor public space where ten or more people are gathered.  
  • All employers shall take reasonable steps, where practicable as work duties permit, to protect their employees by encouraging use of masks and facial coverings; maintaining six feet of separation between employees; regularly disinfecting frequently used items and surfaces; encouraging handwashing; preventing employees who are sick from coming into contact with other persons; facilitating remote working arrangements; and g. minimizing employee travel. In addition to complying with the requirements of this paragraph, employers are strongly encouraged to read and implement the Alabama Department of Public Health’s “Guidelines for Safeguarding All Businesses available here.

Alaska:

  • On November 16, Governor issued several orders. It advises all Alaskans to minimize the risk of COVID-19 wash your hands, wear a mask when around others, stay at least 6 feet away from others when possible, keep your interactions and circles small when possible. Even for mild symptoms get tested. Currently, Alaska does not order the general use of masks, limit group size, or business operations, but does encourage Alaskans to do their part to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Arizona:

 

  • Governor issued an order that prohibits organized public gatherings events of more than 50 people unless the city, town, or county has determined that adequate safety precautions, consistent with applicable guidance, are documented as part of the request.

 

Arkansas:

  • Governor extended the state of emergency
  • On November 16, Governor established a COVID-19 Task Force that will make recommendations to the Governor on necessary measures to combat the virus during the winter months.  New mandates may be forthcoming.

California:

  • The CA Department of Public Health is ending the Regional Stay Home Order across California. This action comes as projected ICU availability rose above 15%. Counties will return to their assigned Blueprint tiers.
  • State Health Department issued a regional stay-at-home order. If a region falls below the 15 percent ICU threshold, it will have 24 hours to implement the Stay at Home Order.

The five regions are: Northern California: Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity. Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma. Greater Sacramento: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba. San Joaquin Valley: Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Benito, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne. Southern California: Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura. Regions will remain in the Regional Stay at Home Order status for at least three weeks once triggered. Counties are eligible to come off the Regional Stay at Home Order after three weeks if their hospital ICU capacity projected four weeks out reaches 15 percent.

  • Once triggered, all gatherings with members of other households are prohibited in the Region, with limited exception. All individuals living in the Region shall stay home or at their place of residence except as necessary to conduct activities associated with the operation, maintenance, or usage of critical infrastructure, as required by law, or as specifically permitted in this order. Once triggered, operators should review and implement this guidance.
  • Effective November 21, 2020, the California Department of Health issued a limited Stay-at-Home order, effective in counties under Tier One (Purple) of California's Blueprint for a Safer Economy, requiring that all gatherings with members of other households and all activities conducted outside the residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation with members of other households cease between 10:00pm PST and 5:00am PST, except for those activities associated with the operation, maintenance, or usage of critical infrastructure or required by law. Nothing in this order prevents any number of persons from the same household from leaving their residence, lodging, or temporary accommodation, as long as they do not engage in any interaction with (or otherwise gather with) any number of persons from any other household, except as specifically permitted herein.
  • Governor Gavin Newsom announced actions on November 16, 2020 to slow the spread of the virus. The state is pulling an emergency brake in the Blueprint for a Safer Economy resulting in 94.1 percent of California’s population in the most restrictive tier. This change is effective November 17, 2020. California is also strengthening its face covering guidance to require individuals to wear a mask whenever outside their home, with limited exceptions.
  • The 28 counties moving back into Tier 1(Purple/Widespread) include: Alameda, Napa, Santa Cruz, Butte, Nevada, Siskiyou, Contra Costa, Orange, Solano, El Dorado, Placer, Sutter, Fresno, San Benito, Trinity, Glenn, San Joaquin, Tuolumne, Kern, San Luis, Obispo, Ventura, Kings, Mendocino, Merced, Santa Barbara, Santa Clara, Yolo, and Yuba.           
  • The nine counties moving back into Tier 2 (Red/Substantial) include Colusa, Marin, Plumas, Del Norte, Modoc, San Francisco, Humboldt, Mono and San Mateo.
  • The two counties moving back into Tier 3 (Orange/Moderate) include: Calaveras and Sierra.
  • The California Occupational Safety & Health Board approved a new standard to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in workplaces in the state, including at self storage facilities. Cal/OSHA has posted FAQs and a one-page fact sheet on the regulation, as well as a model COVID-19 prevention program
  • First, employers must implement a written COVID-19 Prevention Program that must contain several required provisions. As one example, employers must develop a system for communicating information about COVID-19 such as asking employees to report to the employer, without fear of reprisal, COVID-19 symptoms, possible COVID-19 exposures, and possible COVID-19 hazards at the workplace. Further, storage operators and owners must develop and implement a process for screening employees for and responding to employees with COVID-19 symptoms.  Employers must have an effective procedure to investigate COVID-19 cases in the workplace, and if a case is confirmed, take several additional steps. Operators must implement effective procedures for correcting unsafe or unhealthy conditions. Additionally, there are several training requirements that employers must implement, including, but not limited to, training regarding the employer’s COVID-19 policies and procedures to protect employees from COVID-19 hazards. There are also social distancing and mask mandates. Generally, all employees must be separated from other persons by at least six feet, with limited exceptions, and employers must provide face coverings and ensure they are worn by employees. Storage operators must implement other engineering and administrative controls. For example, employers must identify and regularly clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and objects, such as doorknobs, elevator buttons, equipment, tools, handrails, handles, controls, and bathroom surfaces. The standard also outlines several recordkeeping and reporting requirements. In the event of a positive COVID-19 case, employees may not return to work until at least 24 hours have passed since a fever of 100.4; COVID-19 symptoms have improved; and at least 10 days have passed since COVID-19 symptoms first appeared. The standard also includes a provision that covers employer-provided housing, which some storage owners may provide to live-on-site managers. However, most provisions of that section are not applicable if the occupants maintained a household together before living in the employer-providing housing, such as family members in an apartment at a self storage facility.

 

Los Angeles, CA:

 

  • The County announced another Safer-at-Home Order that imposes limits on gathering sizes as well as mandates mask usage, among other requirements.
  • Health Department issued an order that sets forth the requirements for implementation of the COVID Dial. Individual restrictions remain in place concerning limitations on activities, travel, and public gatherings. Workplace restrictions remain necessary to implement standard Distancing Requirements, cleaning standards, and other items necessary to reduce the possibility of disease spread. Additionally, certain businesses and activities require specific guidance based on their business practices, and those are included in the appendices to this Order.
  • The Health Department issued an order that imposes several new restrictions that are specific to certain industry sectors and also depends upon what color the region is classified as currently (that depends upon the severity of recent COVID spread).
  • Governor extended the mask mandate.

Connecticut:

  • Governor issued an order that increases fines for violation of gathering size restrictions. 
  • State of Emergency extended until February 9, 2021.

Delaware:

  • Governor issued an order, easing some of the gathering size limitations. 
  • Governor issued an order, encouraging all residents to stay home as much as possible.
  • Governor issued an order that requires use of face coverings, limits gathering sizes, and imposes occupancy limitations. 
  • Governor extended the state of emergency. 

 

Florida:

  • Governor issued an order that extends Phase 3.

 

Georgia:

  • Governor issued an order (02.26.21.02), providing additional guidance for Empowering a Healthy Georgia in response to COVID-19.
  • Governor extended order below.
  • Governor issued two orders, renewing the Public Health State of Emergency as well as the order outlined below.
  • Governor issued an order that is effective from November 16, 2020 until November 30, 2020 (unless extended or modified). Critical infrastructure, including self storage, that continue in-person operation during the effective dates of this order must implement measures which mitigate the exposure and spread of COVID-19. Such measures may include, but shall not be limited to the following, which shall be implemented to the maximum extent practicable: screening and evaluating workers who exhibit symptoms of COVID-19; requiring workers who exhibit symptoms of COVID-19 to not report to work or to seek medical attention; enhancing sanitation of the workplace as appropriate; disinfecting common surfaces regularly; requiring handwashing or sanitation by workers at appropriate places within the business location; prohibiting Gatherings of Workers during working hours; permitting Workers to take breaks and lunch outside, in their office or personal workspace, or in such other areas where proper Social Distancing is attainable; implementing teleworking for all possible Workers; implementing staggered shifts for all possible Workers; holding all meetings and conferences virtually, whenever possible; delivering intangible services remotely, whenever possible; discouraging Workers from using other Workers' phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment; prohibiting handshaking and other unnecessary person-to­ person contact in the workplace; if in use, open sales registers must be at least six (6) feet apart; point of sale equipment, including PIN entry devices and signature pads, should be frequently cleaned and sanitized; and placing notices that encourage hand hygiene at the entrance to the workplace and in other workplace areas where they are likely to be seen.
  • State of emergency in effect until December 9, 2020 (likely to be extended beyond that date). 

Hawaii:

  • Governor extended emergency proclamation. 
  • Governor extended order outlined below.
  • Governor issued an order that remains in effect until at least December 31, 2020, that permits businesses that are part of the federal critical infrastructure sectors identified by the U.S. Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency, including self storage, may continue to operate.
  • All persons in the State must wear a face covering over their nose and mouth when in public. The requirements of this statewide mask mandate are set All persons must comply with applicable safety, hygiene and physical distancing guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as well as with State, county, industry and regulatory practices for safety, hygiene and physical distancing, including standards and requirements adopted and issued by Hawaii Department of Health (DOH).

Idaho:

  • Governor issued an order, prohibiting gatherings of more than 10 people, both public and private. People participating in gatherings of 10 or fewer people, while permitted, must adhere to the Physical Distancing and Sanitation Requirements. Employers must develop and implement measures to ensure employees and customers maintain at least six-foot physical distancing from other individuals whenever possible; provide adequate  sanitation  and  personal  hygiene  for  employees,  vendors, and patrons; and frequently disinfect commonly touched and high-traffic areas and regularly clean those areas.

Employers should identify how personal use items such as masks, face coverings, and gloves may be required by employees, vendors, and/or patrons; provide services while limiting close interactions with patrons; identify strategies for addressing ill employees, which should include requiring COVID-19 positive employees to stay at home while infectious, and may include keeping employees who were directly exposed to the COVID-19 positive employee away from the workplace, and the closure of the business until the location can be properly disinfected; on a case-by-case basis, include other practices appropriate for specific types of businesses such as telework where appropriate, screening of employees for illness and exposures upon work entry, requiring non-cash transactions, etc.; and implement additional protocols established in the Governor's Guidelines for Opening up Idaho and the business-specific protocols published at https://rebound.idaho.gov/.

Illinois:

  • Governor issued an order that updates the mitigation tier phases.  
  • Governor issued an order that all businesses must continue to evaluate which employees are able to work from home, and facilitate remote work from home when possible; ensure that employees practice social distancing and wear face coverings when social distancing is not always possible; ensure that all spaces where employees may gather, including locker rooms and lunchrooms, allow for social distancing; and ensure that all visitors (customers, vendors, etc.) to the workplace can practice social distancing; but if maintaining a six-foot social distance will not be possible at all times, encourage visitors to wear face coverings; cap occupancy at 25 percent capacity for customer-facing activity; and prominently post the guidance from the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and Office of the Illinois Attorney General  regarding workplace safety during the COVID-19 emergency.
  • The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO), in partnership with IDPH, has developed industry-specific guidance and toolkits to help businesses operate safely and responsibly.  These documents are available here and here. This Executive Order places additional restrictions on DCEO’s industry-specific guidance, and supersedes the DCEO guidance where there is a conflict.
  • Businesses must take proactive measures to ensure compliance with Social Distancing Requirements, including where possible designating with signage, tape, or by other means six-foot spacing for employees and customers to maintain appropriate distance; having hand sanitizer and sanitizing products readily available for employees and customers; implementing separate operating hours for elderly and vulnerable customers; posting online whether a facility is open and how best to reach the facility and continue services by phone or remotely; and, providing employees with appropriate face coverings and requiring that employees wear face coverings where maintaining a six-foot social distance is not possible at all times.When the work circumstances require, providing employees with other PPE in addition to face coverings.

Chicago:

  • Mayor issued an advisory  to advise all residents of Chicago to stay at home in response to the rapid rise of COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the city. Residents are advised to only leave home to go to work or school, or for essential needs such as seeking medical care, going to the grocery store or pharmacy, picking up food, or receiving deliveries. If you do leave home, you must always wear a face covering and practice social distancing by staying six feet away from others. It also imposed additional occupancy limitations.

Indiana:

  • Governor announced the extension of the order below.
  • Governor extended order below. 
  • Governor extended the order outlined below. 
  • Governor issued an order. All businesses continuing operations or resuming full operations are required to develop a plan to implement measures and institute safeguards to ensure a safe environment for their employees, customers, clients, and members. All open businesses and entities must re-evaluate any existing plan and update it to reflect current business practices and safeguards. The business plan must be provided to each employee or staff and posted publicly. The plan shall address, at a minimum, the following points: an employee health screening process; employing enhanced cleaning and disinfecting protocols for  the  workplace, including regularly cleaning high-touch surfaces; enhancing the ability of employees, customers and clients to wash hands or take other personal hygiene measures such as use of hand sanitizer; and complying with social distancing requirements established by the CDC, including maintaining six-foot social distancing for both employees and members of the general public when possible and / or employing other separation measures such as wearing face coverings or using barriers when social distancing is not possible.
  • All businesses are required to place clearly visible signage at their public and employee entrances notifying that face coverings are required for all individuals entering the business. Businesses shall require employees to wear face coverings. Businesses should  only admit  those customers, clients, vendors and other visitors  who wear face coverings.
  • All businesses and entities must take proactive measures to ensure compliance with the social distancing and sanitation requirements as outlined in this directive, including: designating with signage, tape or by other means, six (6) feet of spacing for employees, customers, clients or members to maintain appropriate distance; having hand sanitizer, and sanitizing products,  readily  available  for  employees and customers; cleaning and disinfecting of work areas, and even more frequent cleaning of high-touch areas; continuing to implement or resuming separate operating hours for the elderly and vulnerable customers and continuing to offer online ordering and/ or curbside pickup; posting online whether a facility is open and how best to reach the facility and to continue services by phone or remotely.
  • All employers, whether manufacturers, distributors, professional offices, retailers or others, must comply with safety and health standards established and enforced by IOSHA. Employers are subject to specific standards to prevent the exposure or spread of a disease. Additionally, the General Duty Clause requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.

 

Iowa:

  • Governor extended mask mandate and limitations on gathering sizes. 
  • Governor extended the order outlined below. 
  • Governor issued an order that requires use of masks, limits gathering sizes, and requires businesses to implement other preventative measures. 
  • Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds issued an Order that is currently in effect through December 10, 2020 that requires Iowa employers, including storage operators, to require use of masks in their facilities and also limits permissible gathering sizes. Further, all employers must evaluate whether any more of their employees can feasibly work remotely and to the extent reasonable, shall take steps to enable such employees to work from home; take reasonable precautions to ensure the health of their employees and members of the public, including appropriate employee screening, social distancing practices, and increased cleaning and hygiene practices.
  • All people two or older must wear a mask or other face covering when inside an indoor space that is open to the public and within six feet of individuals who are not members of their household for 15 minutes or longer (with limited exceptions).  Additionally, indoor gatherings of more than 15 people are prohibited as are outdoor gatherings of more than 30 people.
  • Governor extended the state of emergency until December 10, 2020. 
  • Governor issued an order, effective, November 25, 2020, any person in Kansas must wear a face covering when they are in the following situations inside, or in line to enter, any indoor public space; obtaining services from the healthcare sector in settings including, but not limited to, a hospital, pharmacy, medical clinic, laboratory, physician or dental office, veterinary clinic, or blood bank; waiting for or riding on public transportation or while in a taxi, private car service, or ride-sharing vehicle; while outdoors in public spaces and unable to maintain a 6-foot distance between individuals (not including individuals who reside together) with only infrequent or incidental moments of closer proximity.
  • All businesses or organizations in Kansas must require all employees, customers, visitors, members, or members of the public to wear a face covering when employees are working in any space visited by customers or members of the public, regardless of whether anyone from the public is present at the time; employees are working in any space where food is prepared or packaged for sale or distribution to others; customers, members, visitors, or members of the public are in a facility managed by the business or organization; or employees are in any room or enclosed area where other people (except for individuals who reside together) are present and are unable to maintain a 6-foot distance except for infrequent or incidental moments of closer proximity.

Kentucky:

  • Governor issued orders that require use of masks and limits permissible gathering sizes.
  • Governor issued an order, effective from November 20, 2020 to December 13, 2020, that all indoor social gatherings are limited to a maximum of two (2) households and a maximum of eight (8) people. A household is defined as individuals living together in the same home. All professional services and other office-based businesses must mandate that all employees who are able to work from home do so and close their businesses to the public when possible. Any office that remains open must ensure that no more than 33% of employees are physically present in the office any given day.

Louisiana:

  • No new orders have been issued recently.

Maine:

  • Governor extended the mask mandate.
  • Governor issued an order, requiring use of masks as well as limiting permissible gathering sizes. 
  • Governor extended the state of emergency. 

Maryland:

  • Governor issued an order, requiring continued use of face masks and easing some occupancy limitations. 

 

Massachusetts:

  • Governor issued an order that imposes occupancy limitations. 
  • According to local news reports, Governor does not have any immediate plans to change rules and restrictions related to COVID-19.
  • Governor issued an order on gathering sizes and use of masks. 
  • Health Department issued an order that imposes a mask mandate and limits permissible gathering sizes. 
  • On November 15, 2020, Michigan Health Department issued an order, that imposes occupancy limitations and requires use of masks.

Minnesota:

  • Governor extended the order outlined below.
  • Governor issued an order that requires continued use of face masks and several other measures. All businesses in Minnesota (whether Critical or Non-Critical) have been required to have a COVID-19 Preparedness Plan (“Plan”) and implement that plan. All businesses must continue to follow the same requirements. Each Plan must provide for the business’s implementation of guidance for their specific industry or, if there is no specific guidance, general guidance for all businesses, as well as Minnesota OSHA Standards and MDH and CDC Guidelines in their workplaces. These requirements are set forth in guidance (“Plan Guidance”) available on the Stay Safe Minnesota website (https://staysafe.mn.gov).
  • Required Plan content. As set forth in the Plan Guidance, at a minimum, each Plan must adequately address the following areas: Require work from home whenever possible. All Plans must ensure that all workers who can work from home continue to do so. Ensure that sick workers stay home. All Plans must establish policies and procedures, including health screenings, that prevent sick workers from entering the workplace. Social distancing. All Plans must establish social distancing policies and procedures. Worker hygiene and source control. All Plans must establish hygiene and source control policies for workers. Cleaning, disinfection, and ventilation protocols. All Plans must establish cleaning, disinfection, and ventilation protocols for areas within the workplace. Customer facing businesses. All businesses that are customer facing (i.e., businesses that have in-person customer interactions) must include additional Plan provisions to keep the public and workers safe as set forth in the applicable guidance available on the Stay Safe Minnesota website (https://staysafe.mn.gov). This includes requirements that workers and customers must maintain physical distancing of 6 feet and that store occupancy must not exceed limits set forth in the guidance. In customer facing businesses that share common areas, such as malls, all Plans must similarly include a facility occupancy that must not exceed the limits set forth in the guidance and provide an enhanced sanitizing, cleaning, and disinfecting regimen consistent with Minnesota OSHA Standards and MDH and CDC Guidelines for those common areas. All Plans must also include signage in common areas to discourage congregating.
  • Workers and businesses are subject to the requirements set forth below. These requirements may be clarified, as deemed necessary by the Governor, to ensure the health, safety, and security of all Minnesotans. Clarifications will be available for public review at the State’s COVID-19 website (https://mn.gov/covid19/). Continue to work from home whenever possible. Any worker who can work from home must do so. Safe work. The protections noted in Executive Order 20-54 (Protecting Workers from Unsafe Working Conditions and Retaliation) remain in full force and effect. All work must be conducted in a manner that adheres to Minnesota OSHA Standards and MDH and CDC Guidelines, including social distancing and hygiene practices. Under existing law and authority, DLI may issue citations, civil penalties, or closure orders to places of employment with unsafe or unhealthy conditions, and DLI may penalize businesses that retaliate against employees who raise safety and health concerns.
  • Governor extended the state of emergency until December 12, 2020. 

Mississippi:

  • Governor issued an order, reducing or eliminating many COVID-19 mitigation measures. 
  • Governor extended the “Safe Recovery” Order through January 15, 2021.

Missouri:

  • State of Emergency extended until March 31, 2021. 

Montana:

  • The Governor issued an order that requires use of masks, limits permissible gathering sizes, and closes certain businesses. Self storage may remain open subject to the limitations outlined in the order.

Nebraska:

  • No new orders have been issued recently.

Nevada:

  • Governor issued an order that slowly eases gathering sizes. 
  • The Governor issued an order that, among other requirements, mandates use of masks, imposes occupancy limitations, and limits permissible gathering sizes.

New Hampshire:

  • Governor extended state of emergency.
  • Governor issued an order that beginning on November 20, 2020, all persons over the age of 5 within the State of New Hampshire must wear a mask or cloth face covering over their noses and mouths any time they are in public spaces, indoors or outdoors, where they are unable to or do not consistently maintain a physical distance of at least six feet from persons outside their own households.

New Jersey:

  • New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy issued an order that requires all businesses in New Jersey, including self storage owners and operators, to implement several measures outlined below starting on November 5.
  • Every operator that requires or permits employees to be physically present at their facility must: Require that individuals maintain at least six feet of distance from one another to the maximum extent possible; Require employees, customers, visitors, and other individuals entering the worksite to wear cloth or disposable face masks while on the premises, with limited exceptions; Permit employees to remove face masks when the employees are situated at their workstations and are more than six feet from other individuals at the workplace, or when an individual is alone in a walled office; Provide, at their expense, face masks to their employees; Deny entry to the worksite to any employee, customer, or visitor who declines to wear a face mask, except when doing so would violate State or federal law; Provide sanitization materials, such as hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol and sanitizing wipes that are approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency for SARS-CoV-2 virus to employees, customers, and visitors at no cost to those individuals; Ensure that employees practice regular hand hygiene, particularly when such employees are interacting with the public, and provide employees break time for repeated handwashing throughout the workday and access to adequate hand washing facilities; Clean and disinfect routinely all high-touch areas in accordance with DOH and CDC guidelines, particularly in spaces that are accessible to employees, customers, or other individuals; Separate and send home employees who appear to have symptoms; Clean and disinfect the worksite in accordance with CDC guidelines when an employee at the site has been diagnosed with COVID-19 illness; and, Continue to follow guidelines and directives issued by the New Jersey DOH, the CDC and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, as applicable, for maintaining a clean, safe, and healthy work environment.
  • On November 16, governor issued an order that imposes occupancy limitations for both indoor and outdoor gatherings. The indoor gathering limit will decrease from 25 to 10 people. The outdoor gathering limit will decrease from 500 people to 150 people.
  • Governor extended the state of emergency. 

 

Newark, New Jersey:

  • According to local news reports, Newark is asking its residents to stay at home from November 25 to December 4.

New Mexico:

  • Health order was extended. 
  • Health order imposes limitations and mandates certain measures be taken by businesses in counties deemed “green,” “yellow,” or “red” which relates to new cases and infection rates.
  • The Governor extended the public health order (outlined below).
  • The New Mexico Department of Health issued an order that requires certain businesses to close and permits essential businesses, which expressly includes self storage, to remain open, provided they minimize their operations and staff to the greatest extent possible. The order is operative from November 13, 2020 until November 30, 2020 (unless otherwise modified or extended). All essential businesses must comply with the pertinent “COVID-Safe Practices (CSP’s)” section(s) of the “All Together New Mexico: COVID-Safe Practices for Individuals and Employers” that can be accessed here and any identified occupancy restrictions.
  • All businesses must: limit operations to remote work to the greatest extent possible; arrange workplace to provide for 6 feet of distance between individuals wherever possible; close common areas where personnel are likely to congregate wherever possible or modify them to minimize contact; provide for all meetings to take place remotely whenever possible; ensure all employees have face coverings or masks and wear them in the workplace at all times when in the presence of others, except when eating, drinking or swimming, or unless otherwise advised by a health care provider; train all employees on daily cleaning and disinfecting protocol, hygiene, and respiratory etiquette (e.g., covering coughs); make handwashing, sanitizer, and other hygiene support available to employees; screen employees before they enter the workplace each day. Send employees home who are experiencing the following COVID-19 symptoms related to COVID-19 and direct them to obtain free testing through the Department of Health; prohibit employees with known close contact to a person who is lab-confirmed to have COVID-19 to return to work until authorized by the Department of Health; and, adhere to all CDC and OSHA guidelines. Additionally, New Mexico storage operators must comply with the “COVID Safe Practices for Manufacturing, Warehouse, and Food Production” section, which can be accessed here.
  • Health Department announced, in an effort to increase proactive COVID-19 testing of New Mexico’s workforce and avoid additional temporary restrictions on essential businesses, the New Mexico Departments of Health and Environment have implemented a voluntary surveillance testing and contact tracing agreement to enable businesses to prevent mandatory 14-day closures triggered by state rapid responses to COVID-19 cases.

 

New York:

 

  • On November 13, Governor issued an order, limiting hours of operation for bars, restaurants, and gyms. Self storage is not impacted by this order.

 

North Carolina:

  • Governor issued an order, easing many of the previous restrictions. 
  • Governor extended the modified stay-at-home order.
  • Governor extended the modified stay-at-home order.
  • Governor issued an order that encourages high-risk individuals to stay home. It mandates that businesses implement several preventative measures. It also requires continued use of masks and mass gatherings are prohibited. Mass gathering means an event or convening which brings together more than ten (10) people indoors or more than fifty (50) people outdoors at the same time in a single confined indoor or outdoor space.
  • Governor issued an order that strengthens the mask mandate in the state.
  • Governor extended the Phase III order. It mandates, among other requirements, use of masks well as puts limits on permissible crowd sizes. 

 

North Dakota:

  • On November 13, the Health Department issued an order, requiring Businesses to post one or more signs that are visible to all persons—including workers, customers, and visitors—instructing them to wear face coverings as required by this Order. Businesses must require that all persons, including their workers, customers, and visitors, wear face coverings as required by this Order. When possible, businesses must provide accommodations to persons, including their workers and customers, who state they have a medical condition, mental health condition, or disability that makes it unreasonable for the person to maintain a face covering, such as permitting use of an alternate form of face covering (e.g., face shield) or providing service options that do not require a customer to enter the business. Businesses may not require customers to provide proof of a medical condition mental health condition, or disability, or require customers to explain the nature of their conditions or disability.
  • Governor issued an order that imposes limitations on permissible gathering sizes.

Ohio:

 

  • Health Department issued a limited stay home order
  • Health Department extended the order below.
  • The Health Department issued an order that requires individuals to remain at home between 10 PM and 5 AM. Individuals may be outside of their home for certain purposes, which includes going to work. 
  • On November 17, the Health Department issued an order that prohibits public or private gatherings of more than 10 people. 

 

Oklahoma:

  • On November 16, Governor issued an order that imposes restrictions on certain businesses such as bars and restaurants. It does not appear to impact self storage.

Oregon:

  • Governor issued an order that imposes several requirements on businesses depending upon the current risk level of the county where the business is located.
  • Governor announced updates to county risk levels under the state's new public health framework to reduce transmission and protect Oregonians from COVID-19. The framework uses four different risk levels for counties based on COVID-19 spread—Extreme Risk, High Risk, Moderate Risk, and Lower Risk—and assigns health and safety measures for each level. Effective through Dec. 17, 25 counties will be in the Extreme Risk level, five counties will be High Risk, two counties will be Moderate Risk, and four counties will be Lower Risk. A complete list of counties and their associated risk levels is available here. The Oregon Health Authority will examine and publish county data weekly. County risk levels will be reassigned every two weeks. The first week's data will provide a "warning week" to prepare counties for potential risk level changes. The next assignment of risk levels will take effect Dec. 18.
  • Effective Dec. 3 through Dec. 17, 25 counties will be in the Extreme Risk level, five counties will be High Risk, two counties will be Moderate Risk, and four counties will be Lower Risk. A complete list of counties and their associated risk levels is available here .
  • From November 18 to December 2, Oregon will be in a statewide Two-Week Freeze to stop the rapid spread of COVID-19 across Oregon.
  • State of emergency and price gouging restrictions in effect until at least January 2, 2021.

 

Pennsylvania:

  • Governor issued an order expanding permissible indoor and outdoor gathering sizes.
  • Governor announced the time-limited mitigation orders put in place on Dec. 12 have helped to begin flattening the curve of new cases following the post-Thanksgiving surge in Pennsylvania. As a result, the time-limited orders as written expired Jan. 4. With the expiration of the time-limited orders, mitigation efforts will revert to mitigation orders in place on Dec. 11.
  • On December 10, Governor issued an order that all in-person businesses serving the public within a building or defined area may only operate at up to 50% of the maximum capacity stated on the applicable certificate of occupancy, except as limited by existing orders to a smaller capacity limit. Also, indoor gatherings and events of more than 10 persons are prohibited as well as outdoor gatherings and events of more than 50 persons.
  • Governor issued an order that requires businesses to implement teleworking, cleaning protocols, mitigation measures, contact tracing, employee isolation, limit capacity, and several other preventative measures. Additional mitigation measures may be viewed here
  • Department of Health issued an order, mandating a near universal mask mandate. With limited exceptions, every individual, age two and older, in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania shall wear a face covering when: indoors or in an enclosed space, where another person or persons who are not members of the individual’s household are present in the same space, irrespective of physical distance. Outdoors with others who are not members of a person’s household and unable to maintain sustained physical distance. As permitted in my Order Directing Mitigation Measures, dated July 15, 2020, as amended, for participation in an indoor or outdoor event, gathering, or group setting where another person or persons, who are not members of the individual’s household are present.
  • A business must require that all people, including their employees, customers, teachers, students and visitors, wear a face covering and take reasonable steps to enforce the requirement. Mitigate or eliminate employee, teacher, student, visitor, and customer exposure to people who cannot wear or refuse to wear a face covering. Post prominent signs that are visible to all people—including employees, teachers, students, customers, and visitors—stating that face coverings are required by the Order of the Secretary of Health. Provide reasonable accommodations to people, including their employees, teachers, students, customers, and visitors, who state they have a medical condition, mental health condition, or disability that makes it unreasonable for the person to maintain a face covering. Businesses may decline service to individuals who are not wearing a face covering or claiming to have a condition preventing them from wearing a face covering or an alternative to a face covering, so long as they attempt to provide a reasonable accommodation. Accommodations could include an alternative to a face covering, such as use of a face shield or providing service options that do not require a customer to enter the business. This may include offering curbside pick-up, delivery, or other innovative solutions. A business or a school entity should not: Enforce face covering requirements when it is unsafe to do so. Restrain, assault, use force, or physically remove employees, teachers, students, customers, or other individuals who refuse to comply with this Order when it would not otherwise be legal to do so. Violate other laws, including state and federal anti-discrimination laws.

Philadelphia, PA:

  • Mayor issued an order that imposes a strict mask mandate and also restricts permissible gathering sizes. It is in effect from November 20, 2020 until January 1, 2021 (unless otherwise modified or rescinded). 

Rhode Island:

  • Governor issued an order, mandating use of masks, imposing occupancy limitations, and other preventative measures. 
  • Governor extended the mask mandate.
  • Governor extended the state of emergency. 
  • Governor issued an order that all Rhode Island residents are advised to stay home from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. Sunday through Thursday unless traveling to or from work. It requires certain businesses to close. Self storage may remain open but must implement certain preventative measures.
  • Governor issued an order that any person who has been clinically diagnosed with COVID-19 by a licensed health care practitioner by assessment of symptoms or by laboratory testing must immediately self-isolate in accordance with RIDOH guidance
  • Governor extended several orders, including the mask mandate.
  • Governor issued an order that imposes restrictions on gathering sizes, among other limitations and restrictions. 

 

South Carolina:

  • Governor issued an order, that encourages businesses to limit occupancy, among other recommendations and mandates.
  • Governor issued an order, urging local governments to impose masks mandates and also limiting permissible gathering sizes. 

South Dakota:

  • No new orders have been issued recently.

Tennessee:

  • Governor issued an order, urging use of masks and other preventive measures. 

Texas:

  • Governor issued an order, reducing or eliminating many COVID-19 mitigation measures.  

Utah:

 

  • Governor issued an order that requires businesses to require each employee and contractor to wear a face mask while at work; post conspicuous signage at each entrance to the business that lists COVID-19 symptoms; asks employees and patrons experiencing COVID-19 symptoms to stay home; and provides notice of face mask and physical distancing requirements.
  • Utah Governor Gary Herbert issued an order that requires businesses, including storage facilities, to mandate usage of masks by employees and patrons while on site as well as to implement additional preventive measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. More specifically, storage owners and operators must: require each employee and contractor to wear a face mask while at work; require each patron that enters the premises of the business to wear a face mask, including in an area of ingress or egress; require at least six feet of physical distance, including in an area of ingress or egress, between each separate household group at a business. Further, each business must: post conspicuous signage at each entrance to the business that lists COVID-19 symptoms; ask employees and customers experiencing COVID-19 symptoms to stay home; and provide notice of face mask and physical distancing requirements. The order is in effect from November 9, 2020 until November 23, 2020, unless otherwise extended, modified, or rescinded.

 

Vermont:

  • Governor extended previous order.
  • Governor extended previous order. 
  • On November 15, 2020 Governor issued an order that imposes limitations on gathering sizes as well as express limitations for bars and restaurants.
  • All restaurants and other public accommodations which host organized non-essential activities shall maintain an easily accessible, legible log of all employees, customers, members and guests and their contact information, including name, address, phone number and email address for 30 days in the event contact tracing is required by VDH. For the sake of clarity, this requirement applies to all employees and all guests in every party.
  • All businesses must reinstitute, to the maximum extent possible, or reemphasize to the extent necessary, telecommuting or work from home procedures. In person meetings are strongly discouraged and all meetings should be held by telephone or electronically to avoid in person meetings whenever possible.

Virginia:

  • Governor issued an order, easing some of the restrictions below.  Gatherings may now be 25 people as opposed to 10.
  • Governor extended the modified stay-at-home order.
  • Governor issued an order. All individuals in Virginia should remain at their place of residence between the hours of 12:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. Individuals may leave their residences to go to work. Any business not listed in Section II, subsections A or C below must adhere to the Guidelines for All Business Sectors expressly incorporated by reference herein as best practices. This guidance is located here.  It also mandates continued use of masks.
  • All public and private in-person gatherings of more than 10 individuals who do not live in the same residence are prohibited. The presence of more than 10 individuals performing functions of their employment or assembled in an educational instructional setting is not a “gathering.”
  • Effective November 16, 2020, Governor issued an order that requires any businesses not listed in sections A or C to adhere to the Guidelines for All Business Sectors. This guidance is located here
  • All public and private in-person gatherings of more than 25 individuals are prohibited. The presence of more than 25 individuals performing functions of their employment or assembled in an educational instructional setting is not a “gathering.”
  • On November 16, Governor issued an order requiring continued use of face masks.
  • Governor signed "Healthy Washington - Roadmap to Recovery" proclamation, which he had initially announced last week. The new plan, which follows a regional approach, will ease some restrictions while focusing on the health and safety of all Washingtonians. The plan outlines the metrics that will be used to determine phases for each region, and the Department of Health will evaluate these metrics weekly and will announce any changes to current phase status every Friday. The proclamation is effective immediately, and extends through the COVID-19 state of emergency.  Read the full Healthy Washington - Roadmap to Recovery plan here.  Read the full proclamation here. Guidance for businesses and employees is available here
  • Governor extended order outlined below. 
  • On November 15, 2020, Governor issued an order that remains in effect through December 15, 2020. It imposes several new, additional restrictions such as permissible gathering sizes.

West Virginia:

  • On November 16, 2020, Governor issued an order, requiring use of face coverings.  Businesses that invite the public into their facilities shall require compliance with the terms of the Order, shall post adequate signage notifying patrons of the requirements of this Order, and shall enforce the same on their premises

Wisconsin:

  • Governor issued an order requiring use of masks. 
  • Governor issued an order, encouraging all residents to stay at home as much as possible.  All businesses are strongly encouraged to take the following measures to limit exposure to COVID-19 to staff, customers, and the public: require masks, limit the number of people on the premises to no more than is strictly necessary to perform the business operation. Even if staff are physically present at the business premises, use online or phone meeting to avoid staff congregating in offices, conference rooms, or shared spaces. To the greatest extent possible, comply with social distancing of 6 feet between all individuals on the premises, including but not limited to employees, customers, and members of the public. Businesses may have to rearrange office space, workspace, or the flow of business in order to provide for social distancing. To the extent possible, increase airflow in work areas and conduct in-person meetings outside or in large open spaces. Adopt policies to prevent staff from entering the premises or worksite if they display respiratory symptoms or have had contact with a person with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID19. Employers may not penalize staff for isolating or quarantining because of symptoms or exposure to COVID-19. Increase standards of facility cleaning and disinfection of all areas. This should include an emphasis on high-touch areas such as door handles, railings, restrooms, buttons, touch screens, office equipment, tools, shared vehicles, payment devices or cash registers, and counters. Businesses must adopt protocols to clean and disinfect the premises in the event of a positive COVID-19 case in the workplace. Post signage in languages understood by your employees and customers reminding staff and customers of safe business practices, social distancing requirements, hand hygiene, and cough/ sneeze etiquette. Where possible, offer curbside pick-up, curbside drop-off, delivery of goods and services. Where possible, offer online or phone payments, appointments, and reservations. Cease door-to-door solicitation. Review and adopt measures in the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation guidelines on safe business practices.

Wyoming:

  • The Health Department extended several orders relating to use of masks and distancing. 
  • The Health Department issued an order that imposes limitations on permissible gathering sizes and requires use of masks under certain circumstances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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